A Closer Look at Creative Commons Licensing

Unsure about copyright? Here’s a very helpful post on Creative Commons from Lit World Interviews.

Lit World Interviews

publicdomain.large

We’ve spoken about copyright before on here on LWI, but a lot of scribblers are still unaware of some of the pitfalls out there, especially when it comes to the Creative Commons (CC) licenses. As I’ve often said, when it comes to copyright infringement for both content and images, it is always better to err on the side of caution.  Unless you’re a hundred percent certain that using someone else’s work can’t possibly get you sued, don’t use it.  When it comes to this issue, ignorance of the law doesn’t count.  You are always at fault even if you don’t know what copyright means, and as such, if you’re sued you’re more than likely going to have to pay up.

While titles of books are not subject to copyright, and you can use them as you please, the content of books and also songs are very much so, unless they…

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Tables of Contents in Ebooks: Yes!

A big thank you to JW Manus for this helpful post on Table of Contents and Amazon.

QA Productions

There’s a big brouhaha going on now with Amazon. Scammers and other crooks have flooded Kindle Unlimited. Amazon is making one of their sweeps in an attempt to root them out. As per usual, when automation is unleashed, innocents get caught up in the net–sometimes with very expensive consequences.

One of the ways publishers are being dinged has to do with the tables of contents. Crooks are manipulating them to game the Kindle Unlimited page reads, so Amazon is going after ebooks that lack a standard (in form and in placement) ToC. Amazon highly recommends that every ebook has an active (publisher generated) table of contents, and requires an internal table of contents (this is what you see when you use the Go To feature on a Kindle). For more information on Amazon’s policies, start here and don’t forget to read this.

ToC Blog 1

The two most common arguments I…

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How to Publish Posts that Search Engines Will Love

Handy to keep these tips in mind when blogging. Thanks to Chris Smith for the info.

The Daily Post

In the world of website creation, on-page SEO is one of the most important factors (if not the most important) in helping potential visitors find your site.

On-page SEO is a term that describes the elements — both content- and code-based — that produce a page that ranks well for searches around a certain topic. Building a perfectly optimized page is challenging; overdoing it might result in penalized sites and poor rankings.

While there are countless guides out there, each with their own opinions on what an optimized page entails, there are a few important factors that practically every SEO resource agrees on — factors that come organically with good content, which search engines love. Let’s go through six of the most crucial ones.

Your Audience Comes First

Great content satisfies a need that a person visiting your site has.

The expression “Content is king” has been tossed around the search engine marketing sphere for a number of years. It’s used as…

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7 Signs a Person is Suffering from Author Fatigue

Thanks to Charles Yallowitz for this entertaining post.

Legends of Windemere

Yahoo Image Search Yahoo Image Search

Does this really need an intro?  Sure most, if not all, of us have been here at some point.  This is possibly a new thing I’ll do from time to time, which was inspired by John W. Howell’s Ten 10 Lists on Mondays.

  1. You start dreaming about editing and it steadily becomes a nightmare.  Their, there, and they’re attack out of the shadows.  You’re strapped to a chair and forced to watch all of your greatest typos play out in front of a giant crowd.  Also, you’re naked and the dog ate your manuscript.  Not sure where the dog came from, but it looks remarkably like your old English teacher who swore you wouldn’t be able to write your name much less a novel.
  2. You sit down to write at the laptop and blast away an epic chapter that is the best you’ve ever done.  Your…

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How to Tighten Up Your Dialogue

Another good one from Drew Chial.

Drew Chial

When I’m writing a novel my train of thought needs to stay on track. If I loop around to edit I run out of steam. So I keep shoveling coal into the engine and words onto the page. Sometimes there’s nothing but rails all the way up the horizon. Sometimes curves in the mountains keep me from seeing where I’m going. Some routes are ideal while others are just serviceable.

The process forces me to wear many hats. I’m both the conductor and the stoker, tasked with staying on schedule and fueling the creative process. If I overthink the path the crankshaft screeches to a halt. So I keep chugging along until the first draft is done. No sense in letting writer’s block derail me.

When I write dialogue I get a sense of where the scene needs to go and let my cast say the first things that come…

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