How Writers can Trick Themselves into Working After Work

Burning the Candle at Both Ends?

Drew Chial

We writers are always told to never quit our day jobs, but day jobs can have a dramatic effect on our creative output.

Sales employees have to put their brightest faces forward, give their firmest handshakes, and work their damnedest to mirror their clients. Reps have to know which way their buyers are leaning before the buyers do. Reps have smile through rejection and nod through micromanagement. When sales reps come home all that time spent aligning with their clients’ concerns has left them emotionally exhausted.

The last thing salespeople want to do is to have to deal with fictitious people’s needs, with their own urgent needs and unresolved conflict. So how do those of us with aspirations beyond our current functions make good on our dreams? How do we find the time to write around our responsibilities?

The Writer’s Ideal Fantasy

When I first got it in my head…

View original post 968 more words

What’s My Motivation? Why Writers Need to Motivate All of Their Characters

Thanks to Drew Chial for this post on character motivation.

Drew Chial

Plot driven stories focus on external conflict. Character driven stories focus on inner turmoil. Plot driven stories are more situational than personal. While characters may evolve in plot driven stories, they never change as much as the world around them. Plot driven stories are action oriented. Characters don’t have the luxury of self examination before they make decisions. Their situation is too urgent.

The plot driven story approach is ideal for fast paced globe trotting adventures, sci-fi fantasies, and anything with a clock counting down to Armageddon. That’s why most blockbuster movies take the plot driven approach. It keeps the characters in danger and makes the audience feel like they’re on a rollercoaster.

The problem with plot driven stories is when their fast pace leaps over gaps in the plot.

Often the villains’ motivations are skimmed over like a slight of hand magic trick that becomes obvious reexamination. In most…

View original post 832 more words