Seven Basic Ways To Increase Your Blog Traffic in Thirty Minutes

Great tips from Suzie on blogging.

Suzie Speaks

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You’ve written a blog post that you’re proud of. You’ve read, re-read, edited, re-edited and then edited again once after you’ve inevitably discovered lots of mistakes that were missed. You’ve created a pinnable picture and included all your social media links.

Then the little-one starts to cry. Dinner needs to be made. The laundry needs to be hung out to dry. In my world, papers need to be marked.

For those of us that want our blogs to be seen, but have busy schedules, children, jobs and homes to maintain, we often find it difficult to promote ourselves to the biggest possible audience. Time is always our biggest barrier and in the blogging world it is highly unlikely that a post will receive lots of views simply by pressing the publish button.

When researching this post, I found lots of blogs that were offering lots of advice that I didn’t…

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Sinking The Lusitania: An Act Of Mass Murder By The Banksters

Controversial but very interesting post on this 100th Anniversary of the sinking of the Lusitania.

Fools Crow's Blog

by Gabriel Donohoe

 lusitania on fire

On this day 99 years ago, a German U-boat sunk the RMS Lusitania off the southern Irish coast with the loss of 1,195 lives, including 128 Americans. 94 children perished, 31 of them mere babies. This incident became the major catalyst for drawing a reluctant America into the European slaughter pens of World War 1.

But was the sinking of the Lusitania one of those unfortunate acts that occur randomly during war or was there a more sinister and deliberate hand at work?

In a disputed incident like this, one often gets to the truth of the matter by asking the question, “Cui bono?” “Who benefits?” After a detailed examination of the facts, one can only come to the conclusion that it was the banksters who benefitted, and grossly at that.

The RMS Lusitania was one of the world’s biggest ships and the pride…

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The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap by Paulette Mahurin

Thanks to Ms M for a very clear and concise review of this book. It looks to be a very good story-line, that’s quite relevant to our day.

Ms M's Bookshelf

PersecutionOfMildredDunlapThe Persecution of Mildred Dunlap is set in a small town in Nevada called Red River Pass in the year 1895. The story begins the day a telegram arrives with the news that author Oscar Wilde has been sentenced to two years hard labour by a British court of law under the recently passed gross indecency law making it illegal for men to have sex with men. When the news arrives in Red River Pass, it sets into motion a series of events of racism, hatred, religious discrimination, vicious rumour, jealousy, and, finally, subtle, satisfying revenge.  It reminded me a bit of Little House on the Prairie where Nellie and her mother were always stirring things up and starting rumours, except that here it’s carried to extremes.  As in any community, there are people who bully others and indulge in malicious gossip and those who refuse to stand up to them…

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Steven Pressfield’s Foolscap Method Template

Here is an example of what you can learn on this free online course. Thanks for such a helpful post, Jonathan.

Mind Bursts

Fig.1 Fig.1. Steven Pressfield’s ‘Foolscap Method’ to write a novel

Once more I am loving the Open University’s free online course ‘Start Writing Fiction’ on FutureLearn: it only started this week so there is plenty of time to join now. This free online course is all about character, so us novice fiction writers struggle with thoughts on plot. I love this from author Steven Pressfield: ‘The Foolscap Method’ is for me the ‘Creative Brief’ by another name, or even Churchill’s dictum of being given reports on a single sheet of paper. By setting parameters and being succinct you are forced to get to the kernel of an idea. When constructing a story then, say a novel, answer the following. I find I return to and refine this often and eventually have it on the wall to stop me wandering off … those ideas and stories can be kept for…

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