Are You an Outliner?

Very good interview with author Eoin Colfer about his writing process. He was a teacher for fifteen years and says that being a writer feels more like a hobby to him than a job and he hopes it stays that way. Eoin has written thirty books including Artemis Fowl and The Supernaturalist. This video is full of very useful tips, I really enjoyed it.

How to Kill One of Your Characters

writing, characters death, novels,The problem with developing your characters and making them as realistic as possible is that when you have to kill one of them, you hesitate. I’m at a point in my latest book where I need to write a death scene for one of my favourite characters. This person has been with me throughout the first book and now, in the sequel, I must say goodbye. I’m not joking, it is such a difficult thing for me to do that I’m into another chapter and still haven’t done the dastardly deed. This has been going on for over a week and I have decided that this weekend it just HAS to happen. I know how, where and when to do it, but as crazy as this must seem, I keep putting it off. I even thought about scrapping the scene altogether but it’s a vital part of the story and leads to life changing circumstances for the other main characters. So (sniff, sniff) needs must.

Does anyone else have this problem? I’ve just finished a trilogy and in the third book, a character who had been there from the beginning dies, but I knew from the second book that this was going to happen – and I still got a little teary-eyed. Maybe I just need time to accept my character’s fate once I’ve sealed it. The plus side of this, is that I’m writing more chapters than I intended, by putting off the dreaded event. I have even added a twist that injects a bit of mystery into the story.

If certain words in this post get picked up by search engines on the hunt for criminal activity, I promise, it’s all in my head. Keeping the characters out of my heart is the problem.

Starting From Zero

Self-publishing? Good advice here, thank you David Gaughran.

David Gaughran

lets_get_digital_amazonSuccess can seem unattainable to those starting out. It’s easy to forget that even the biggest sellers started from zero.

Amanda Hocking didn’t arrive on the scene as a fully formed sales machine. She didn’t have a platform which she had been diligently building up for years, nor did she come from trade publishing. She was unable to convince an agent to take her on and decided to self-publish instead, and then sold a million e-books in nine months!

Detractors tried to paint Hocking as an anomaly — and she was, in the sense that anyone who is phenomenally successful at anything is an anomaly.

But that missed the point: she was able to sell as much as the biggest names in publishing without the help of a publisher.

Soon, others followed suit. Authors like Bella Andre, Hugh Howey, HM Ward, Liliana Hart, and Barbara Freethy have sold millions of e-books…

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